Home Made Brush Cleaner / Cleanser

 Home Made Brush Cleaner / Cleanser
Home Made Brush Cleaner / Cleanser

4.8

49 reviews

95% would repurchase

Package Quality: 4.1

Price: $$

Package Quality: 4.1

Price: $$

INGREDIENTS

1 cup distilled water 1/4 cup alcohol 1/2 tbsp. clear shampoo 1/2 tbsp. dishwashing liquid 1 tbsp. liquid spray-in conditioner

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Age: 25-29

Skin: Combination, Fair, Not Sure

Hair: Blond, Wavy, Medium

Eyes: Green

A few months ago I began cleaning my Real Techniques makeup sponge with a mix of olive oil and some Ecover dish soap. The difference is amazing. Something about the oil really helps to slick out makeup. Previously I would just use dish soap to clean the sponge, and the process seemed endless every time. Even after 10+ minutes of rubbing the sponge with soap, rinsing it, and squeezing out the water, there would still be some discoloration. I hated it. But not only does the oil/dish soap mixture get out every trace of makeup, somehow I need to rinse the sponge far fewer times until I stop seeing suds in the water I squeeze out. In other words, the soap is easier to rinse out, too. Cleaning my sponge probably takes a third of the time now, and it's much cleaner at the end of the process.

I've tried using this mixture on makeup brushes, too, but I have to say I don't notice a huge difference like I do with the sponge. I sometimes wear this heavy duty waterproof MUFE concealer, and so I do sometimes like using it on the concealer brush to get out the sticky, waterproof makeup. For my blush, highlighter, and eyeliner brushes, though, dish soap alone does about as good a job.

4 of 4 people found this helpful.



Age: 30-35

Skin: Normal, Fair, Cool

Hair: Blond, Curly, Fine

Eyes: Blue

This is what I use to clean my brushes (including my beloved beauty blender): dish soap, bath and body works hand soap and a large spoonful of coconut oil...no exact proportions, just as much as needed for the amount of brushes. I mix it in a square flat bottom "bowl" and dip the brushes in and then rub them across my palm alternating between under the faucet and not until they are clean, of course I avoid getting the the metal holder wet and keep the water temperature mild. When the brush looks clean and the water runs clear and not soapy I squeeze the water out with a towel (cloth or paper) and hang the brushes upside down in groups to dry. With my beauty blender and any other sponge I saturate with water, then soap and massage it in. After that I gently squeeze it under the faucet until it's clean. My brushes end up so soft and obviously clean and fresh. I've never had any issues with this method and combo of things.

5 of 5 people found this helpful.


on 10/16/2016 9:22:00 PM

Age: 25-29

Skin: Dry, Fair, Warm

Hair: Brown, Wavy, Fine

Eyes: Brown

That's one cool, cool diy idea. Like, the coolest cosmetic diy technique I ever experienced. That means a lot!
So, when I'm on the prowl for something cosmetic I have the slightest, smallest perception I can do it myself, I'm on it. Mainly ending in terrible disasters and spending more than buying the real thing. It gets frustrating! But I had, HAD to give this a try. I literally had everything I needed at home.
I own some brushes. Nothing expensive, nothing fancy, I think the one that costed me more is worth, like, 5 euros. I've been using fingers all my life so I'm a newbie in the fascinating brushes world. I own just a handful for the essential needs (foundation, blush, powder, concealer, kabuki,and two Real technique sponges) and I take good care of them, but I never went further than washing them straight on my shampoo-soaked hand and like, twirling the hair until the deed was done, and jumping in the shower right after. The results were okay but pouring that much water on them might ruin the base.
Anyway, this diy cleanser kept on popping up in my MUA page, so eventually grabbed all the needed items and went for it:
Some dish soap
Some shampoo (Garnier's lavender something)
Some conditioner (as above)
Some alcohol (90%)
A plastic glass

I put everything in the plastic glass and dipped the brushes one by one.
I have this Revlon foundation brush which is lovely and does the deed but unfortunately, the only time I saw it fresh and clean (it has a white top of hair and the rest of it is black) was the day I opened it from the envelope. It turned beige forever when I first used the foundation, and no amount of soap and hot water ever cleaned it. Well, I dipped it for like 5 seconds, rinsed, and it was as white as freshly unboxed. AMAZING!
The other brushes were just fine and needed literally a 2 seconds dip to get nice and squeeky clean.
I'm really entushiast of this method and thankful to the MUA community for providing such an interesting and easy way for cleaning brushes. I strongly recommend a try! Will try the spray technique asap.

6 of 6 people found this helpful.


Age: 36-43

Skin: Acne-prone, Medium Brown, Not Sure

Hair: Blond, Other, Other

Eyes: Brown

I used this to clean my brushes and it only took a few minutes. It dried incredibly quickly as well. My brushes turned out clean and soft. Great DIY product.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.


on 4/25/2016 3:52:00 AM

Age: 44-55

Skin: Dry, Fair-Medium, Not Sure

Hair: Brunette, Other, Other

Eyes: Brown

The best cleanser for brushes (and those darn hard-to-wash Beauty Blenders) is Dr. Bronner's Liquid Castile Soap. I like using the almond scented one, or the unscented. Get one of those small silicone mitts (for grabbing hot pans from the stove) and use it as an aid to get all the makeup off. Wet your brushes thoroughly, but try not to get the ferrule (metal part which holds the bristles) wet. Moisture will loosen the glue, so I don't recommend "soaking" the brushes in any type of solution for any amount of time. Squeeze some of the soap onto the mitt (you can cut it in half if you wish) and swirl your brush head against the ridges. Rinse thoroughly.

10 of 10 people found this helpful.


Age: 36-43

Skin: Normal, Fair, Not Sure

Hair: Blond, Other, Other

Eyes: Blue

Can't go wrong doing it the cheap way (if you do it right ;)

could turn out a variety of ways depending on your water source. As it says below, don't use soap because the ph level change. A little vinegar goes a long ways. :)

1 of 1 people found this helpful.


on 1/19/2016 5:54:00 PM

Age: 56 & Over

Skin: Oily, Fair, Neutral

Hair: Brown, Straight, Fine

Eyes: Hazel

Since this brush cleanser if DIY, there will be many variations.

I live in a hard water area (looking into yet another eco-friendly water treatment). I would not use soap because of the ph--just look at the scum that soap leaves on your shower.

I like the produce cleanser as a "green" and excellent cleanser, followed by a good rinse with water + a touch of vinegar.

I would not put conditioner on my face, therefore I would not put it on the brushes. I think it would have adverse effects on product and the face.

5 of 7 people found this helpful.


on 10/2/2015 1:40:00 PM

Age: 44-55

Skin: Other, Other, Not Sure

Hair: Other, Other, Other

Eyes: Other

This is an excellent brush cleaner and it's as cheap as can be! Super easy to make and at least as good as any other brush cleaner, great find on here!


on 9/30/2015 10:44:00 PM

Age: 44-55

Skin: Combination, Fair-Medium, Warm

Hair: Blond, Straight, Fine

Eyes: Green

I am reviewing bar soap under makeup brush cleaners. I use Zest soap. All that you do is wet the soap real well and brush the soap with your brush as if you are painting the soap. The soap will get dirty from your makeup from the brush, just rinse the soap and keep brushing it until the soap is clean. Your brushes will be positively spotless!

6 of 7 people found this helpful.


Age: 19-24

Skin: Combination, Fair-Medium, Cool

Hair: Brunette, Straight, Fine

Eyes: Brown

I have never purchased a brush cleaner. I use anti-bacterial hand soap and mix it in with sorborlene cream. I know it sounds like a weird combination but the sorborlene cream can actually be used as a body wash if you have dry skin. When I use it inconjunction with the hand soap it is amazing. The brushes feel amazingly soft and the hand soap kills the germs and bacteria on the brushes. I haven't had any major shedding and I own brushes that are over 4 years old and they are still in great condition.

6 of 7 people found this helpful.

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