Lancome La Vie Est Belle

Lancome La Vie Est Belle

3.7

206 reviews

58% would repurchase

Package Quality: 4.1

Price: $$$

Package Quality: 4.1

Price: $$$

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on 11/6/2012 12:32:00 PM

Age: 56 & Over

Skin: Combination, Fair, Neutral

Hair: Brunette, Straight, Fine

Eyes: Hazel

I think I just found my HG!! Who knew I would fall in love with a sweet gourmand?? After a frustrating hour in Nordstrom's trying to find a fragrance to bring home with me, I spotted LVEB and tried a tiny spritz. It was love at first sniff!! I accused my poor saleslady of holding out on me, but to her defense, she also had no idea I would suddenly decide I loved sweet gourmands. Before that time, I mainly wanted Orientals and Chypres. But LVEB lifted me up to fragrance nirvana. Being a little skeptical about sinking my teetlh into a brand new fragrance-I purchased the small bottle. It is now empty and I have already purchased the biggest bottle they had. I just love love love this fragrance. I don't care about reviews, generally, but I see some people have really hated this fragrance. It is NOT for everyone as the sweetness can be a bit cloying. But on my perfume-eating skin, it's just right! Plus-my husband loves it!! What more could I want?? Do yourself a favor and give it a try!

12-11-2013 Almost a year since I wrote the above and I'm still loving this fragrance! I'm on my third large bottle and have been through a few smaller ones as well! This is still a HG for me and I have yet to tire of it.

16 of 16 people found this helpful.



on 8/11/2012 12:43:00 PM

Age: 36-43

Skin: Other, Other, Not Sure

Hair: Other, Other, Other

Eyes: Other

A fruity-praline-patchouli scent that'd smell great on someone else. I tested this on a card in store, not on skin. The review will be updated if it smells very different on skin. But I want to pop this on MUA, in case anyone is curious about it. :) Warning: I use the words 'sweet', 'sweetness' and 'sugar' A LOT in this review.
The sweetness suffocates when first sprayed (instant diabetes), the dry down's better, definitely powdery, if still extremely sweet. It reminds me of Pleasures Delight at the start, but the Lauder is more marshmallow and Lveb is spun sugar or praline-vanilla -- maybe there's a bit of cocoa in there too, but there's so much general sweetness, I can't really tell. I prefer Lancome's Lveb because it's a little less sugary -- (and that speaks volumes about the Lauder). Perhaps there's better differentiation between notes (marginal) because Lveb isn't quite the jumbled sweet-mess that PD becomes on me.
Lveb's patchouli note isn't too loud, which is a minus, because I prefer less praline / vanilla and more patchouli. I get the pear / blackcurrant listed in notes, but the level of sugar in this one really smothers the fruit, and the listed iris is cancelled. I don't get much -- if any -- iris. It smells a little dry, which might be an attempt at iris. If you're good at figuring out gourmand iris scents (I'm not) maybe you'll have better luck. If I look harder than I want to: there's a hint of something like bergamot and orange blossom, no obvious jasmine. But I don't want to focus on a scent like it's a magic-eye picture in order to see past a prominent feature -- in this case vanilla-praline-sugar.
If you liked fruity-patchoulis and want something similar or more youth-oriented, that tweaks and 'updates' the theme -- try Lveb. I prefer the original Badgley Mischka. I've worn Angel, Coco-M and a heap of others in this vein (let's go ahead and add Flowerbomb, even though its patchouli is supposedly light and 'purified').
While the Lancome is nice, it's not all that new. It is softer on the patch than the others, and certainly less heavy on the fruit than BM. But it keeps hitting me with the all-consuming sweet mid-notes. I need something in the base for balance, and the Lancome doesn't deliver. That's probably the update: the lack of heavy patchouli/solid bases which was a feature of the big fruichoulis.
The development on the card is actually pretty good. This could've worked if the sugary notes weren't so girly-but-ferocious. That said -- it isn't loud, exactly -- not in the way Poison, Giorgio or Angel are loud. (I love those perfumes). To me it Lveb is a super-feminine (and a bit more posh) gourmand with a steady, unrelenting, wave of sugar -- and despite its insistent nature, it's a notch above average department store gourmands flooding the market.

It's really not me - hence the low rating. It smells a little young, with no interesting twists. The bottle's okay and I like that the spokeswoman (Julia Roberts) is a grown-up. I just remembered a scent that successfully reworks the heavy fruichouli idea and has a praline-like note in the middle: Angel Innocent. The Mugler is more to my taste because the top has some freshness which cancels out any 'candy-floss' effect -- and it's a little different -- it surprises me. I *think* Ropion worked on both Innocent (with Bruyere) and Lveb (with Flipo and O. Polge). If memory serves -- Oriens by VC&A is another one with praline, if you want mainstream scents with that note. Gourmands I like with obvious fruit notes: Hanae Mori extrait, BM, Delices, Pozo's In Black and Hot Couture. I still think Hypnose by Lancome is one of the brand's better, contemporary releases. Patchouli favourites: I have about a hundred, so I'll stop now!

13 of 14 people found this helpful.


Age: 36-43

Skin: Dry, Tan, Warm

Hair: Brown, Straight, Fine

Eyes: Green

I have well over two hundred fragrances in my collection and have used up or given away or sold off probably twice as many as that over the years. They range from the corniest celebrity frags to Jicky and Bond No.9's. I am NOT in the 'you should only wear perfume that is appropriate for your age' camp.
What does that mean??? It's scent, not short shorts. Do you tell children they have to stick to sugary food and leave the asparagus for when they're older? Do you take ice cream away from old ladies because 'everyone' knows that stuff's for kids? My God.
Now, I DO get that there might be times and places where a fragrance might not be welcome...hospitals, close offices, etc. I try not to wear any if I know I'm gonna see my mom 'cause she gets migraines. And so on. But being too old to wear a gourmand? No.
This scent is sweet, and on me it is mostly all sweet; the jasmine and iris never really show themselves...the closest to not-sweet is that I get a little patch-tobacco (tobacco in a good way).
It is not a bold, groundbreaking scent; it's office appropriate. Nothing wrong with that.
What I use this for is to layer with Shalimar when I want to wear Shalimar in places similar to what I described above. Shalimar is 'too much' sometimes for noses used to Marc Jacobs Daisy or Pink Sugar 24/7. (I have both those too, I'm just saying).
One spray of La Vie est Belle over one spray of Shalimar and people are stalking me through Ulta/Barnes & Noble/Nordstroms to finally ask what I have on when they can't figure it out. They actually complement each other wonderfully.
For this reason I would buy it again, because I love Shalimar and love people to start entertaining the idea that they could wear it. ( they'll graduate to loving it on its own if they give it that first chance). Try it.
If you like Jimmy Choo/Coco Mademoiselle/Flowerbomb you'd like this. If you DONT like those because they're a hair too sweet but you do like sweet, try this. It's very nice.

11 of 11 people found this helpful.


Age: 19-24

Skin: Acne-prone, Tan, Not Sure

Hair: Black, Wavy, Medium

Eyes: Blue

LVEB is a strong powdery gourmand. I was initially wary of trying it out because of the patchouli, which I can not usually endure. So many perfumes were ruined for me with the inclusion of that dreaded patch note. Here, the vanilla and praline add just the right amount of sugary sweetness to rob the patchouli of its earthy edges, and the base emerges as a minty cool confection following a top and middle of the thickest vanilla ice cream sprinkled with the ripest blueberries (probably the currant). I like the iris, responsible for lending the scent an elegant, formal touch. I could not really detect the other florals though.

If sugar is not like crack for you, then step away from this bottle. The staying power is tenacious, and you will receive compliments without a doubt. La vie is easy to like, since it follows in the footsteps of the massively popular Flowerbomb and Coco Mademoiselle. Certainly, it is not unique, but I think it marries patchouli and praline very well for an attractive price point. Lancome perfumers knew what they were doing when they reinterpreted a familiar formula. Much like a romance novel, the patchouli gourmand has a set recipe, but LVEB has enough character to be more than a modern garden variety scent thanks to the understated glamor of iris, which for better or worse is becoming increasingly utilized in popular department store releases as a way to compete with niche houses. But whatever La vie lacks in olfactory innovation, it more than compensates with its welcoming, winning personality. Got to find that scarf around the neck of the bottle just adorable. Notes: pear, black currant, orange blossom, iris, jasmine, patchouli, vanilla, tonka bean, praline.

11 of 11 people found this helpful.


on 8/22/2012 11:27:00 AM

Age: 19-24

Skin: Sensitive, Fair-Medium, Warm

Hair: Brunette, Straight, Medium

Eyes: Brown

It's very sweet, very cotton candy-like. It reminds me of Flowerbomb by Victor&Rolf. Another perfume that smell's a bit like this is Black XS by Paco Rabanne (but XS is even sweeter). I guess, if you have one of those, you don't really need this one.
.
This smells like all of the sweet things in a bakery. This is so sugary that I can't really detect much else in this fragrance, which makes it pretty boring to me. Generally, I would say this smells like something one would eat/it smells gourmand. I'm not a fan of such sweet and cloying smells. The description says:
"This gourmand yet elegant composition is developed by perfumers Olivier Polge, Dominique Ropion and Anne Flipo. The final formula is the result achieved after three years of probation and 5000 versions."
So, after 3 years, 3 of France's leading perfumers came up with THIS...?
.
BTW, I don't consider this an 'elegant' smell - it smells like something a typical teenage girl would wear, and therefore, to me it doesn't smell particularly expensive. The other type of person this reminds me of is a plus-sized super happy lady that loves to bake.
.
Not work-environment friendly, I would say. Both my boyfriend and I, who both has sensitive noses can't handle this - it's so strong!
.
The staying power is good - I wish all of the perfumes I love had such staying power. You should be VERY careful about how much you put on - only a few drops is what it takes to fill a small room with the smell of this.

11 of 13 people found this helpful.


Age: 56 & Over

Skin: Combination, Fair-Medium, Not Sure

Hair: Blond, Other, Other

Eyes: Blue

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE realize how horrible this fragrance smells to those around you. I'm not sure if there is "anosmia," or lack of smell to a certain chemical after exposure, but this perfume is so popular. As a registered nurse who sees 10 patients a day, I can tell you that when women come in with this one on, I almost have to put a mask on.

It is the overuse of an aromachemical that I am imagining Lancôme uses as a "blackcurrant" note; a bitter, somewhat herbal topnote that never goes away with this fragrance. To those around you, this note smells like insecticide. Since your nose is blind to this note, you spray on more, thinking you smell pretty and sweet. Please take my advice and make sure this perfume is discontinued quickly so that no one ever has to smell it again. I'm that serious.

10 of 18 people found this helpful.


Age: 30-35

Skin: Normal, Fair, Warm

Hair: Blond, Straight, Coarse

Eyes: Green

I never bought this. I won it. I would not have bought this myself, but I did not give it away even though I find it pretty horrible. I still wear it because it does not give me a headache but it is very generic and it smells just like every other modern perfume creation. It is sweet and sharp, it does not have any soft, round powdery notes that would make one feel womanly and fleshy and warm. It is loud like a teenage girls. It lacks elegance. It reveals too much. It does not wake any interest if I pass this on the street. It is too obviously a perfume. It compares to makeup that is too much and unblended.

9 of 13 people found this helpful.


Age: 44-55

Skin: Dry, Fair-Medium, Not Sure

Hair: Brunette, Other, Other

Eyes: Brown

I am a signature fragrance person, I do not wear numerous perfumes. Until receiving La Vie Est Belle as a birthday gift I have been wearing La Chere which was purchased during a trip to France. Immediately with the first note I knew this was an amazing fragrance, it is soft but full of glorious scents. No one overwhelms the other, Iris, Patchouli, Vanilla , spun sugar and pecan are a few of the flavors used to create a beautiful aroma. Unfortunately I do not have the ability to describe how exotic, sensual, sophisticated and lingering this fragrance is. I never review fragrance as every female is different wanting for a scent uniquely suited to her. La Vie Est Belle is a signature fragrance, one that years from now someone will remember you by. I hope this helps anyone who is considering trying La Vie Est Belle

8 of 9 people found this helpful.


on 8/23/2012 2:36:00 AM

Age: 56 & Over

Skin: Dry, Fair, Neutral

Hair: Other, Straight, Fine

Eyes: Hazel

La Vie est Belle flaunts loads of powdery iris on top, with jasmine and orange blossom, a generous helping of praline, vanilla, and is anchored with subtle patchouli in the base. Very feminine, extremely sweet, very pretty in the later drydown but a bit overwhelming for me with iris, sweet praline and vanilla in the opening and early in the drydown. Reminds me of a mix of Coco Mademoiselle, Flowerbomb, and Prada Candy. I get several hours of longevity from La Vie Est Belle, and it's around even the next morning. The final drydown the next day is much like Shalimar Initial with the iris, jasmine, vanilla and patchouli.

8 of 11 people found this helpful.


Age: 44-55

Skin: Normal, Fair, Not Sure

Hair: Red, Other, Other

Eyes: Brown

LVEB is to the 2010s what Coco Mademoiselle was to the 2000s and what Angel was to the 1990s: a high-quality, impeccably crafted sweetchouli that you smell everywhere, that is the ambient noise behind every high-end cosmetics counter... but that you grudgingly admit to be very nice. It's more wearable for me than either Coco Mad or Angel-- which is likely because it sat in focus groups for a long time getting cleansed of any hint of filth or controversy.

I wear and enjoy LVEB without expecting it to be other than what it is. If you poured into a cauldron Pink Sugar, Euphoria, Fantasy, Flowerbomb, Prada Candy, and every iteration of Marc Jacobs and Juicy Couture over the past 10 years, and added a touch of the required Lancome maturity so that the scent could be convingly worn by those >35, you'd have LVEB. It is sweet but not silly, grounded quite well by the iris and patchouli, and it projects for hours and miles so you get your money's worth. It just plain smells good. Great, even. My family far prefers smelling this on me than some of my beloved vintage stinkers (which makes me sad because they don't share my elevated tastes).The praline and blackcurrant are delicious, the patchouli is just-enough, the florals make this clean instead of sticky. It's full-bottle worthy to me, if only because I subjectively prefer it to the many other scents in this category that smell quite similar to it. Sometimes you just want to smell non-controversially "nice" and this one fills that bill.

7 of 7 people found this helpful.


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