Allure magazine

 Allure magazine

2.5

23 reviews

34% would repurchase

Package Quality: 3.3

Price: $$

Package Quality: 3.3

Price: $$

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on 10/9/2017 6:31:00 PM

Age: 36-43

Skin: Sensitive, Fair, Cool

Hair: Brown, Wavy, Medium

Eyes: Green

I've read Allure faithfully for years, but since Linda Wells is gone, this magazine has really gone down the tubes. It use to be a beauty magazine. Now it's very political. It's all about vaginal steaming and planned parenthood. I don't feel like I'm getting insider beauty advise anymore. The product selections are obviously advertisements. The magazine has become very thin. This use to be my favorite magazine, but not anymore. I've let my subscription lapse.

8 of 8 people found this helpful.



Age: 30-35

Skin: Combination, Fair, Neutral

Hair: Blond, Straight, Fine

Eyes: Blue

Dying print media and no wonder.


Age: 44-55

Skin: Combination, Other, Not Sure

Hair: Brown, Other, Other

Eyes: Blue

I was a huge Allure fan for many years but since Linda Wells and Paul Cavaco "left" it's really gone downhill. They've introduced a more multicultural aspect which is commendable, but now the whole magazine is like that, so it doesn't really hit any one target market as far a skin, makeup and hair product recommendations go, just a little bit of something for everyone. It's also very thin now. After 15 years of subscribing I've just cancelled.

5 of 6 people found this helpful.


on 6/25/2017 1:47:00 AM

Age: 56 & Over

Skin: Dry, Fair, Not Sure

Hair: Brown, Other, Other

Eyes: Blue

Wow....this magazine is starting to get really worthless,
articles that don't matter. This months issue is so thin,
you can barely call it a magazine. PLEASE come back
Linda Wells, or I'll have to cancel my subscription.
And as opposed to all the models being pretty white
women, it's going in the opposite direction trying to
be politically correct. In the July issue, All the models
are black, and anything about hair, skin, won't
work for me. It's turned into the beauty issue of Ebony.
I think most customers will cancel their subscription
because of this issue. It's not relatable to 90%
of the subscribers.


on 2/5/2017 8:26:00 PM

Age: 36-43

Skin: Combination, Fair, Not Sure

Hair: Brown, Other, Other

Eyes: Hazel

I've just recently decided to stop buying this magazine. It was my favourite for years...an entire magazine all about beauty products-my favourite topic! But no longer. The magazine is too thin for the price, I feel like it's 90% advertisements, and I never agree with their picks for "best of beauty"...which used to be my favourite part. I mean seriously for years they've been saying Maybelline Great Lash in the pink and green tube is the best mascara ever....y'all know that mascaras a piece of crap...however it was the first mascara I ever bought-because Allure told me it was the best. Just one example among many. If you want the real scoop check here...real reviews of products tried and tested by real women without hidden motives for promoting a certain product or brand. Also Beautypedia, YouTube...wherever. It's not Allure or any other magazines fault that the internet now exists for people to get their beauty info elsewhere...but they could try stepping up their game by actually having interesting articles. Or hey maybe even free samples attached. At best it's just nice to have a copy on a trip...(or in the bathroom lol) to have pretty pictures to look at, and pictures of new products to drool over...but the price isn't worth the content anymore...

6 of 7 people found this helpful.


Age: 30-35

Skin: Combination, Fair, Cool

Hair: Blond, Curly, Fine

Eyes: Blue

I stopped buying Allure about 6 years ago once I realized that it was just a bunch of ads and endorsements. I never learned any techniques worth anything really...all very basic and/or forgettable. You tube and Instagram makeup artists are they way to go. They have to explicitly state when they are doing sponsorship and ads and you'll learn infinitely more techniques and be exposed to more products that actually work.

2 of 3 people found this helpful.


on 10/6/2016 1:25:00 AM

Age: 44-55

Skin: Sensitive, Fair, Neutral

Hair: Brown, Wavy, Medium

Eyes: Green

I've subscribed to Allure magazine since the nineties and I just have to vent about how I feel about the present state of the only magazine subscription that I've never allowed to lapse. Yes, I realize that very important things are going on in the world, and spending time describing my relationship with Allure seems ... a bit shallow. However, this magazine has always provided a relaxing, guilty pleasure and an escape from reality. Now-a-days it annoys me so much that I'm writing this review and canceling my subscription. It also provides no way to provide feedback to the editorial staff - no letter to the editor or email or anything - it (or Anna Wintour?) doesn't care to know.

The content has become generic, there seems to be no attempt to hide its overtly advertorial feel/role, the writing has become silly and the editorial voice sounds like a chirpy, spacey, a bit snarky teenager with no attention span. Strange direction, since the beauty consumer has become more sophisticated and easily able to see through content that is overly promotional. We have so many other sources of beauty information (hooray for MUA!) and Allure seems not to even try anymore to be relevant. "Beauty" has become a more serious topic for a wider audience, in my view. Appearance has always been, for better or worse, greatly important to people although for most of history it was vulgar to admit. Now, social media and a celebrity-dominated culture (with many of those celebrities only famous for their looks and primarily focussed on their looks) have increased all aspects of the beauty/appearance business exponentially and everyone talks about it freely. Allure is squandering a huge opportunity to become a leading voice of the business and a truly interesting magazine, internet and social media presence. Instead, it reads like an afterthought.

I never really got much out of the fashion features, even though a lot of resources are poured into those pages (photography, location logitics, etc.). The celebrity cover and interview has always been my least favorite feature since there is really nothing to see or read there. The interviews have become unreadable - seemingly put together by a writer who has spent about 12 minutes with the subject and about five minutes filling a page of drudgery. Except now these features are written in a veracular that is supposed to make the writer sound cutesy, clever and funny. Half the articles are about the writers preparation for the interview or silly things the writer did during the interview, etc, etc.. That the resulting covers and inside photographs of the cover person take a full day to do along with who knows how much prep work and, again, resources (money), is astonishing considering the results: one or two full page photographs with maybe another half page, plus the cover. All those resources for very little value to the reader.

The editorial content is, as others have mentioned, full of overtly promotional features of advertisers' products. The bragging rights of the Allure brand, Best of Beauty awards, have devolved from a respected feature to a laughable one. There is no attempt anymore to sell it as the winning favorites of the most knowledgable beauty "insiders" in the business as when it first began 20 years ago. We aren't told how many different brands are tested (only "thousands of products"), how the brands tested were chosen, what percentage are advertisers, and other qualifying information that would lend creditability to the feature. Readers may not have looked for that information twenty years ago, but, as I wrote earlier, we are more knowledgable and sophisticated these days.

Finally, in my view, since appearance is such an interesting topic with unlimited subject matter, I can't fathom why Allure wouldn't extend some journalistic effort to explore the subject. Allure's former editor, Linda Wells, did seem to try to have at least one insightful article a month that explored more deeply different aspects of appearance, not always positive. The new editor, Michelle Lee, who I suspect is not in control of the editorial direction of Allure (that would now be Anna Wintour) and is probably bored to tears by her job has significantly dumbed-down the magazine. She is capable of much better work. Although, to her credit, there is more diversity in the pages (one common complaint). So no more monthly Allure magazine and escapist moments it provided for me. I really wonder what they're thinking over at Conde Nast.

14 of 14 people found this helpful.


Age: 25-29

Skin: Combination, Medium Brown, Not Sure

Hair: Other, Other, Other

Eyes: Brown

Allure hit it's high point around 2004-2006. There were way more interesting articles on skincare and haircare. They also had one feature that I really enjoyed which was following 1 or 2 women for 12 months while they lost weight and got healthy. All of these features have been ditched for more and more advertising. I recently picked up an issue and I was disappointed, it's more fluff articles now, not as much emphasis on products and technique.


Age: 25-29

Skin: Combination, Fair, Neutral

Hair: Blond, Straight, Fine

Eyes: Blue

Sorry, but the only time I would pay money for an advertisement is when I'm buying vintage posters and magazine clippings. Yes Allure, you really pulled one over on me when I was in my late teens and finally getting into makeup- I even bought the stupid products that you shilled, thinking that whoever wrote the article on them actually tested and liked them! I should've known better, even then.

And the how-to articles are bunk (this goes for pretty much all western beauty mags in general). They usually provide one or two pictures and some scant instructions on how to do a look. Most of them aren't that simple and are often setting up the reader for Pintrest-esque disappointment. If you've ever picked up an Asian beauty/fashion mag, the difference is astounding. A tutorial will take up one page and there will be pictures for every single step! They're so thorough that it's ruined me for all other beauty mags.

Why is print dying? That's not even a question. The only people they can still sell this rag to are easily-duped high school aged girls. Though I will give them credit for introducing me to MUA!

4 of 5 people found this helpful.


Age: 36-43

Skin: Combination, Fair-Medium, Not Sure

Hair: Red, Other, Other

Eyes: Green

I loved (back in the day) when they had a feature called How I Got that Look-- a celeb or wealthy person talked about their trademark look...they got rid of that feature and I think the Horoscope page too! Bummer! My Number one beef with allure is How can they be objective about any product they talk about when that company is probably giving them hundreds of thousands of dollars (at least) in advertising revenue..and don't get me started about their promoting plastic/cosmetic surgery..as far as really useful, economic cosmetic tips, try Cosmo or glamour.com..I also am tired of sephora and hearing about how wonderful Great Lash mascara is..I grew up reading Seventeen when it had ads for Cover Girl and Maybelline..if you want hardcore cosmetic advice and pics try French Elle or Marie Claire..but my favorite cosmetic advice is from online blogs and youtube vids..their opionions are not tainted by corporations who are partially funding the magazine..I get allure at used book sale at my library..I don't like the fashion part either..too much compeition nowadays..Allure is sort of past its prime. Thank you ..

2 of 3 people found this helpful.


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