Paula's Choice Beautypedia.com

3.2

124 reviews

58% would repurchase

Package Quality: 3.1

Price: $$

Package Quality: 3.1

Price: $$

Not tested on animals

INGREDIENTS



on 6/28/2015 12:37:00 AM

Age: 36-43

Skin: Other, Other, Not Sure

Hair: Other, Other, Other

Eyes: Other

This is surely a joke! HOW has she been able to discredit so many other great skincare lines like this? She is a crook! Her products are not anything great. Clearly she knows this, which is why she has to stoop to demeaning other lines in order to try to boost hers!

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.



on 6/26/2015 2:14:00 PM

Age: 30-35

Skin: Normal, Fair-Medium, Not Sure

Hair: Brown, Other, Other

Eyes: Blue

The majority of the reviews on this website are mediocre to negative, even for products and brands that are massively popular and hailed by respected beauty journalists and make-up artists throughout the industry. Liz Earle for example, who ethically focus on plant formulations, get a bad rap even though her products have literally transformed my skin!

I can only assume that the purpose of this site is to discredit other products so that people buy Paul's own line of cosmetics, the tab for which is right next to the Beautypedia one! Don't be fooled by it! Paula is not a scientist and the majority of the information is conjecture. Paula's conflicting business model is seriously flawed, she should focus on one or the other.

The site is slightly useful for ingredients lists but even they aren't always there. If you want real honest product reviews, stick to MakeupAlley!

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.


on 6/21/2015 4:20:00 AM

Age: 44-55

Skin: Dry, Olive, Not Sure

Hair: Brunette, Wavy, Medium

Eyes: Brown

I was excited when I found the Beautypedia website. I needed some things and thought I would pull it up on my iPhone while shopping at Ulta, to use as a resource. I knew I didn't want any drugstore things that day. I ended up wasting over 2 hours in the store and getting beyond frustrated. Every single last thing I was interested in only got 1 star. I tried to find something that she approved of that wasn't a drugstore brand and it was almost impossible. That was when I figured out something wasn't right. So much time wasted. I felt tricked. I felt I couldn't be the only one who felt fooled this way. So I researched and found a lot of complaints about her. So frustrating!!! Couldn't believe it.

I did try her a Resist line last year because a friend said she'd been a fan of hers for years. So, on a whim I shelled out for her entire Resist line. I used the entire, totally boring Resist line for 6 months. It just dried out my skin even more and made it look dull. I kept waiting for results, which never happened.

The items I used were: Resist Optimal Results Hydrating Cleanser, Resist Cellular Day Moisturizer with spf 25, Resist Non-Greasy Moisturizer, Resist Wrinkle Repair Retinol serum (super greasy/never absorbed), Skin Perfecting 2% BHA, Resist c15 super booster (smells awful), Resist Toner, Resist Foundation(terrible), Resist Daily Smoothing Treatment 5% AHA, Resist Weekly Resurfacing Treatment 10% AHA. With all of this, I not only saw no results, my skin looked worse. I like to enjoy my skincare. That is huge for me. These products bored me. I ended up throwing what wasn't used up in the garbage.






5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.


on 6/19/2015 2:55:00 PM

Age: 18 & Under

Skin: Acne-prone, Fair, Neutral

Hair: Brown, Wavy, Coarse

Eyes: Blue

i only use it for ingredient list these days.
they give good review to things with irritants and destroy thing that work just because of a brand that they don.t like made it, or it.s to expensive. i just don.t trust her opinion given that just about everything that she sells gives me acne or just doesn.t do anything. i.ll give her one thing she makes the best spf for winter maybe one day she will put out a water resistant mineral spf 50 and she will be the best for summer.

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.


Age: 36-43

Skin: Normal, Fair, Cool

Hair: Brown, Wavy, Fine

Eyes: Blue

Oh, Beautypedia. What would I do without you? I admit it, I’m curious enough to check out the reviews of new products whenever new ones show up. Sure, there’s lots of good info (it's most helpful taken as a guide for what ingredients to *look for*), but there’s also a lot of stuff that doesn’t make sense.

Complaint du jour (of the day):

They have a beef with certain types of alcohols. Some are fine, apparently (the fatty, moisturizing ones and yes, good that they make the distinction — because they are very different ingredients), but heaven forfend a product contain the other sorts (rubbing alcohol is a good catch all proxy so think of that when you think of the kind that they ding).

The thing is, alcohol as an ingredient is actually pretty useful in skincare/beauty products. It can, for example, thin out a formula enough to make the good stuff penetrate through the skin barrier more effectively but also evaporates quickly as soon as it has a chance to do so.

Within a strictly black and white POV, yes, rubbing alcohol is dehydrating (if applied in pure-ish form directly to skin, it’ll dissolve skin oils and such). But, when it allows for other ingredients that are moisturizing or otherwise beneficial to penetrate your skin barrier by temporarily thinning out the formula just long enough for them to go deep/penetrate, on the balance, you will end up more hydrated/treated than not. Depends on the formula of course, but you get the idea. I hope! If I see alcohol in the ingredients and the product works well, GREAT. It probably helped achieve the intended effect.

The studies that are cited by Beautypedia re: alcohol mostly seem to be in vitro (“petri dish”) studies, not in vivo ones (living skin cells with all of the inherent associated complexities). Cells in petri dishes on their own are fragile things and pretty much flop over dead unless bathed in luxurious nutrient baths; anything else and they will crap out and whatever they were doused in gets unfairly dinged as “cytotoxic”. Living cells are very much hardier and have “systems” in place that protect them.

You could dump a bunch of cells in a dish of water and they’d probably die. Is water cytotoxic? Not usually, no. Not in real life. I mean, of course, if you drink a shit ton of the stuff, yes, it’s possible you could die (it’s a thing and people have). Anything is toxic in the right amounts and circumstances.

But, seriously, think about the nature of rubbing alcohol (proxy for so-called “bad” alcohols). How does it usually behave? It evaporates pretty damn quickly, right? RIGHT!!! Especially once exposed to air or otherwise given a chance to evaporate.

Is it really going to be on/in your skin long enough to cause the kind of damage that Beautypedia scaremongers about? Highly unlikely. Chances are, it’ll glance upon your skin for a little bit and then flutter away into the ether. No harm, no foul. Very much different from the studies where cells are bathed in the stuff (even in low concentrations) for far longer than they would be in practical application and covered so as not to allow evaporation.

Blargh :/.

7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.


on 6/8/2015 2:37:00 AM

Age: 19-24

Skin: Dry, Fair-Medium, Not Sure

Hair: Black, Other, Other

Eyes: Black

This is such a disappointment. I've tried following her "top rated" products and they are either in a weird consistency or they break me out. But what's most upsetting is the way her reviews trashes other companies. I mean, even if the product is bad would you really go out in public and call them "useless" and other rude comments followed by a sarcastic tone?

I know Paula's not doing the reviews anymore but whoever she hired needs to stop having such an arrogant and rude tone. Maybe learn your manners before rating and reviewing yourself as the "top rated" brand

6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.


on 5/29/2015 4:11:00 PM

Age: 25-29

Skin: Combination, Fair-Medium, Not Sure

Hair: Brunette, Other, Other

Eyes: Brown

Why do all of her products get "BEST CHOICE" but everything else is too expensive or improperly formulated? Some products I love and she gives them bad reviews, but her products contain so many ridiculous ingredients. She has sold out in my view, as her name used to mean something - Quality. She needs to stick to a few good products, instead of making 500 products with all the same basic components. The less you put on your face, the better.

Also, she has completely gone insane with some of her prices. $24 for a lipgloss and $60 for a vitamin C cream that's the size of a travel toothpaste. Then she bashes other companies for having high prices. Doesn't make sense.

12 out of 13 people found this review helpful.


on 5/27/2015 8:13:00 PM

Age: 36-43

Skin: Combination, Fair-Medium, Not Sure

Hair: Brunette, Wavy, Fine

Eyes: Blue

I used to have breakouts and flaky skin, but I started following Beautypedia's advice and using only "best" rated products, and now my skin looks amazing... Even without makeup or moisturizer. And no, the highest rated products on the site are absolutely not only the house brand - they recommend everything from drugstore brands to high end products, so I'm genuinely confused as to how some people on here can say that the site bashes anything expensive. I will say that there is more high end makeup than skincare with great reviews, but that's mainly due to the fancy moisturizers, cleansers, and serums having tons of fragrance just so you feel like they're more luxurious.

I also think it's funny that people give the site bad reviews because Beautypedia gives poor ratings to stuff they like. I mean, I like chocolate cake, but that doesn't mean it's as good for me as a handful of blueberries... and iceberg lettuce may be natural, but it certainly doesn't have as many vitamins as, well, a vitamin. Why get huffy at someone who points stuff like that out? A foundation may look beautiful, but contain so much alcohol that it's bad for your skin in the long term. And you can go totally natural and put only pure vitamin C powder dissolved in deionized water on your face, but you might not get the benefits because you used them in the wrong proportions and had no way to stabilize the vitamin C. I can go on and on.

The other thing I take issue with in the reviews here is people getting upset that the site gives poor reviews to daytime moisturizers without SPF. This is a proven way to prevent aging - I do agree that it's a personal choice, and if you want to look like a strip of beef jerky someday that's your own business, but why stop other people from being properly informed?

I'll add that I have tried one of her BHA serums and her vitamin C/E serum, and both were great. The BHA cleared up a weird rash on my thigh that had been going on for over a year - not even prescription creams had worked on it.

I don't even think of buying stuff not recommended by this site, and I tell all of my friends to use it too. It's truly the best tool for navigating the misleading claims of the beauty industry.

6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.


on 5/13/2015 1:20:00 PM

Age: 44-55

Skin: Combination, Medium, Not Sure

Hair: Brown, Other, Other

Eyes: Brown

Paula's Choice products have a litany of ingredients. All of her products cause me to have a severe allergic reaction. My allergy doctor could not believe how much crap is in her products. Paula's products are full of synthetic garbage. If you look up most of the ingredients she uses (don't look it up on her site. I mean look up at an actual unbiased site) they are very irritating and almost dangerous. WHO IS POLICING PAULA'S CHOICE?

10 out of 15 people found this review helpful.


on 5/5/2015 7:22:00 PM

Age: 56 & Over

Skin: Combination, Fair, Not Sure

Hair: Brunette, Other, Other

Eyes: Other

Useless website. Informative only if you buy Paula's products.


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